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Author Topic: Richard Bennett Interview  (Read 3231 times)

Offline2manyguitars

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Re: Richard Bennett Interview
« Reply #15 on: November 15, 2020, 11:06:09 pm »
It was a surprise for me to know that a studio veteran with 50+ years of playing never plugs in his guitar at home. I never did as well, I always play unplugged at home.

It's the old 'rest headstock against the wall' thing isn't it. Anything to get a little extra resonance, or to annoy the neighbors! 😉

Quizzaciously, I found that hardly ever using an electric guitar for practice actually made me a better player. Especially practicing on something with a harsh action. For years I used to practice all the time on a battered old archtop with girders for strings. It meant switching to electric for sessions\live seemed really easy.

What do you think?


Onlinequizzaciously

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Re: Richard Bennett Interview
« Reply #16 on: November 15, 2020, 11:22:16 pm »
It was a surprise for me to know that a studio veteran with 50+ years of playing never plugs in his guitar at home. I never did as well, I always play unplugged at home.

It's the old 'rest headstock against the wall' thing isn't it. Anything to get a little extra resonance, or to annoy the neighbors! 😉

Quizzaciously, I found that hardly ever using an electric guitar for practice actually made me a better player. Especially practicing on something with a harsh action. For years I used to practice all the time on a battered old archtop with girders for strings. It meant switching to electric for sessions\live seemed really easy.

What do you think?

I think there's two kinds of guitar playing: physical one and musical one. And with physical learning, absolutely, acoustic guitar will boost your playing, classical guitar maybe even more because of the thick neck and wide string spacing. I think a lot of people do it that way, I remember that Tommy Emmanuel himself chooses 'tougher' guitars for practice just to get his physical guitar playing game strong, that's completely okay.

For people like me though, I don't care about it anymore. I can walk around not playing the guitar for the whole month, then I play it a bit, my fingers sore like crazy, but I get used to it quickly. For me the guitar really is like a friend, you get to see it every now and again, but don't need to see it everyday. I'm not a musician. I don't practice anymore, I just play for fun, strum good songs and record videos for my channel.

Onlinequizzaciously

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Re: Richard Bennett Interview
« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2020, 12:24:26 pm »
WOW


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Re: Richard Bennett Interview
« Reply #18 on: November 16, 2020, 07:13:32 pm »

I actually find it a bit odd that Richard doesn't plug in at home. The amp and the guitar combined make the instrument.

At home I use a Zoom G3n multi effect thing. Either with headphones, or I connect to my hifi. It actually sounds pretty good. The trick is to build your own patches, not use the stock presets, which are mostly garbage.

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Re: Richard Bennett Interview
« Reply #19 on: November 16, 2020, 08:03:05 pm »

I actually find it a bit odd that Richard doesn't plug in at home. The amp and the guitar combined make the instrument.

At home I use a Zoom G3n multi effect thing. Either with headphones, or I connect to my hifi. It actually sounds pretty good. The trick is to build your own patches, not use the stock presets, which are mostly garbage.

I don't know, for me it's a combination of things. First, I'm lazy, so connecting a guitar to the amp is too much of work to me. Moreover, playing with amp is just too loud, I can't play loud because of the neighbours, then again I love to play at night when you can't use amps at all, because don't want to wake up everybody. So in every case going unplugged for practice is enough for me, I don't even bother plugging in when I transcribe songs, I just do it on an electric guitar without amp.

Offline2manyguitars

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Re: Richard Bennett Interview
« Reply #20 on: November 16, 2020, 10:20:03 pm »

I actually find it a bit odd that Richard doesn't plug in at home. The amp and the guitar combined make the instrument.

At home I use a Zoom G3n multi effect thing. Either with headphones, or I connect to my hifi. It actually sounds pretty good. The trick is to build your own patches, not use the stock presets, which are mostly garbage.

I don't know, for me it's a combination of things. First, I'm lazy, so connecting a guitar to the amp is too much of work to me. Moreover, playing with amp is just too loud, I can't play loud because of the neighbours, then again I love to play at night when you can't use amps at all, because don't want to wake up everybody. So in every case going unplugged for practice is enough for me, I don't even bother plugging in when I transcribe songs, I just do it on an electric guitar without amp.

It really depends on what's going to do the work to achieve the sound you want. Effects and patches are great and  99% of budding guitarists will find everything they want there.

I find more in just my fingers and the fretboard first, and maybe some subtle amp effects when necessary. I've spent (well borrowed 😄) thousands on effects gear over the years. Even the high end stuff like the Kempers, Headrush, and helix, while a real step forward and absolutely brilliant, miss the warmth of a decent tube amp.

What I will say is that just like with current drum plugins, the next generation of guitar effects will be incredible.

But it really does depend on what you're doing. Sometimes you want unique, sometimes you want to sound like a boss distortion pedal through a transistor amp from 1985. To quote the master - it's all about serving the song....
« Last Edit: November 16, 2020, 11:02:36 pm by 2manyguitars »

Onlinehunter

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Re: Richard Bennett Interview
« Reply #21 on: November 17, 2020, 03:15:42 am »

I actually find it a bit odd that Richard doesn't plug in at home. The amp and the guitar combined make the instrument.

At home I use a Zoom G3n multi effect thing. Either with headphones, or I connect to my hifi. It actually sounds pretty good. The trick is to build your own patches, not use the stock presets, which are mostly garbage.

I don't know, for me it's a combination of things. First, I'm lazy, so connecting a guitar to the amp is too much of work to me. Moreover, playing with amp is just too loud, I can't play loud because of the neighbours, then again I love to play at night when you can't use amps at all, because don't want to wake up everybody. So in every case going unplugged for practice is enough for me, I don't even bother plugging in when I transcribe songs, I just do it on an electric guitar without amp.

It really depends on what's going to do the work to achieve the sound you want. Effects and patches are great and  99% of budding guitarists will find everything they want there.

I find more in just my fingers and the fretboard first, and maybe some subtle amp effects when necessary. I've spent (well borrowed 😄) thousands on effects gear over the years. Even the high end stuff like the Kempers, Headrush, and helix, while a real step forward and absolutely brilliant, miss the warmth of a decent tube amp.

What I will say is that just like with current drum plugins, the next generation of guitar effects will be incredible.

But it really does depend on what you're doing. Sometimes you want unique, sometimes you want to sound like a boss distortion pedal through a transistor amp from 1985. To quote the master - it's all about serving the song....


Oh, sure, there's nothing like the real thing, but as you know, a tube amp has to be turned up a little to move some air and sound good. Which is usually too loud if you live in an apartment building. And turned down low the sound is so anemic and uninspiring.


On my Zoom I just use a very simply patch consisting of an RC Booster going into a Fender Twin amp with a bit of tape echo and spring reverb added. The speaker cab simulation I use is actually a 2x12 Vox cab. This way I get a good clean sound with a touch of hair on it plus some ambience. Again, it's not the real deal, but it suffices for home use.

Offline2manyguitars

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Re: Richard Bennett Interview
« Reply #22 on: November 22, 2020, 01:31:39 am »

I actually find it a bit odd that Richard doesn't plug in at home. The amp and the guitar combined make the instrument.

At home I use a Zoom G3n multi effect thing. Either with headphones, or I connect to my hifi. It actually sounds pretty good. The trick is to build your own patches, not use the stock presets, which are mostly garbage.

I don't know, for me it's a combination of things. First, I'm lazy, so connecting a guitar to the amp is too much of work to me. Moreover, playing with amp is just too loud, I can't play loud because of the neighbours, then again I love to play at night when you can't use amps at all, because don't want to wake up everybody. So in every case going unplugged for practice is enough for me, I don't even bother plugging in when I transcribe songs, I just do it on an electric guitar without amp.

It really depends on what's going to do the work to achieve the sound you want. Effects and patches are great and  99% of budding guitarists will find everything they want there.

I find more in just my fingers and the fretboard first, and maybe some subtle amp effects when necessary. I've spent (well borrowed 😄) thousands on effects gear over the years. Even the high end stuff like the Kempers, Headrush, and helix, while a real step forward and absolutely brilliant, miss the warmth of a decent tube amp.

What I will say is that just like with current drum plugins, the next generation of guitar effects will be incredible.

But it really does depend on what you're doing. Sometimes you want unique, sometimes you want to sound like a boss distortion pedal through a transistor amp from 1985. To quote the master - it's all about serving the song....


Oh, sure, there's nothing like the real thing, but as you know, a tube amp has to be turned up a little to move some air and sound good. Which is usually too loud if you live in an apartment building. And turned down low the sound is so anemic and uninspiring.


On my Zoom I just use a very simply patch consisting of an RC Booster going into a Fender Twin amp with a bit of tape echo and spring reverb added. The speaker cab simulation I use is actually a 2x12 Vox cab. This way I get a good clean sound with a touch of hair on it plus some ambience. Again, it's not the real deal, but it suffices for home use.

That's not really true and is a valve amp myth. It's just about getting the right one. I have a couple of very small valve amps that I use for practice. My epiphone junior is great at low volumes and is also really versatile in terms of the range of valves you can swap in and out. I also have an even smaller selmer amp given to me by my dad. It's rated at 3w and puts out a satisfying burble at reasonable volumes.

Seriously, grab one. They're not that expensive and in terms of tone you won't look back.

Offlinedustyvalentino

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Re: Richard Bennett Interview
« Reply #23 on: November 23, 2020, 12:30:17 pm »
I'm also too lazy to plug in at home.
"You can't polish a doo-doo" - Mark Knopfler

Offlineqjamesfloyd

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Re: Richard Bennett Interview
« Reply #24 on: November 23, 2020, 01:48:36 pm »
He’s right that instrumentals are so hard to do, so hard to make it interesting. And he did — by carefully constructing the solos. And this golden tone man... From another planet.
[/quote]

It can be done, the likes of The Shadows, Pink Floyd, Mike Oldfield have some great instrumentals.
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Knopfler, Oldfield and Gilmour is all the guitar I need.

Onlinequizzaciously

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Re: Richard Bennett Interview
« Reply #25 on: November 23, 2020, 02:08:04 pm »
It can be done, the likes of The Shadows, Pink Floyd, Mike Oldfield have some great instrumentals.

They have their strong brand names to back it up though, Richard has to go basically unknown into this territory. He's too underrated TBH, and I don't like it at all. Why everything close to MK is so underrated? I'm not complaining but it would be nice if the impact was more significant. Richard's music really deserves more recognition.

Offlinedustyvalentino

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Re: Richard Bennett Interview
« Reply #26 on: November 23, 2020, 02:59:37 pm »
Back in the 60s and 70s people had number 1 hit singles with instrumentals. Nowadays, not so much.
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Re: Richard Bennett Interview
« Reply #27 on: November 23, 2020, 07:16:27 pm »
That's not really true and is a valve amp myth. It's just about getting the right one. I have a couple of very small valve amps that I use for practice. My epiphone junior is great at low volumes and is also really versatile in terms of the range of valves you can swap in and out. I also have an even smaller selmer amp given to me by my dad. It's rated at 3w and puts out a satisfying burble at reasonable volumes.

Seriously, grab one. They're not that expensive and in terms of tone you won't look back.


I've had a VHT Special (or whatever it was called) with a 5 W and 1 W mode. It was decent, but even in 1 W mode, if you want a touch of hair, it's not quiet. So, for me, for home use, I'm perfectly happy with a modeller. If I ever get a house, I'll have a music room, and then I'll get a Twin Reverb he-he

Offline2manyguitars

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Re: Richard Bennett Interview
« Reply #28 on: November 24, 2020, 09:45:18 pm »
That's not really true and is a valve amp myth. It's just about getting the right one. I have a couple of very small valve amps that I use for practice. My epiphone junior is great at low volumes and is also really versatile in terms of the range of valves you can swap in and out. I also have an even smaller selmer amp given to me by my dad. It's rated at 3w and puts out a satisfying burble at reasonable volumes.

Seriously, grab one. They're not that expensive and in terms of tone you won't look back.


I've had a VHT Special (or whatever it was called) with a 5 W and 1 W mode. It was decent, but even in 1 W mode, if you want a touch of hair, it's not quiet. So, for me, for home use, I'm perfectly happy with a modeller. If I ever get a house, I'll have a music room, and then I'll get a Twin Reverb he-he

Another good way of taking ANY valve amp down to neighbor friendly volumes is to put a volume pedal in the FX loop. That way you can drive the amp as hard as you like will decent full range tones and the pedal does the rest.

Kills by a mile any tone from a modeller, although the helix and headrushes of this world are getting closer.

Twin, now you're talking! 😁


Offlinedustyvalentino

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Re: Richard Bennett Interview
« Reply #29 on: November 25, 2020, 12:56:00 pm »
I'm fortunate to own a 1964 Fender Concert, 4x10.

Completely useless at home.  :smack
"You can't polish a doo-doo" - Mark Knopfler

 

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