A Mark In Time

Mark Knopfler Discussion => Mark Knopfler Discussion Forum => Topic started by: quizzaciously on November 13, 2020, 07:19:26 pm

Title: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: quizzaciously on November 13, 2020, 07:19:26 pm
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_9FAT12aCQ
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: PensaGhost on November 13, 2020, 08:34:32 pm
man, more than 3 hours, anything interesting ?
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: quizzaciously on November 13, 2020, 08:54:46 pm
man, more than 3 hours, anything interesting ?

Considering that the first time I ever heard Richard speaking longer that a couple of sentences in a middle of documentary, everything is interesting, yes.

I listened through the first hour and that's simply amazing!
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: TheTimeWasWrong on November 13, 2020, 09:18:08 pm
Thanks for sharing, I’m gonna watch it completely next week. Very curious what he has to say, how does their 25+ years relationship work? Skipping through it I heard Rudiger was the first song he rehearsed with MK.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: quizzaciously on November 13, 2020, 09:29:56 pm
Thanks for sharing, I’m gonna watch it completely next week. Very curious what he has to say, how does their 25+ years relationship work? Skipping through it I heard Rudiger was the first song he rehearsed with MK.

Yes, he said he came up with the acoustic guitar line in the Rüdiger and that's easily one of the best things about the whole song. You don't need to be a superman to guess that he's a cool guy, but turns out he's a super cool guy.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: superval99 on November 14, 2020, 09:46:38 am
I have started listening to this interview and I must say that Richard comes across as a really lovely guy.  I have now reached the part in the interview from around 40 mins to 55mins, which is about Richard's relationship with Mark and they do seem to get on very well together.  Great interview, but very long, so need a break now and then!   ;)
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: quizzaciously on November 14, 2020, 09:49:22 am
I have started listening to this interview and I must say that Richard comes across as a really lovely guy.  I have now reached the part in the interview from around 40 mins to 55mins, which is about Richard's relationship with Mark and they do seem to get on very well together.  Great interview, but very long, so need a break now and then!   ;)

I love the fact that Richard played with a million of people and yet still lists MK as number one influence. That MK guy must’ve done something right it seems.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: straitsway75 on November 14, 2020, 03:54:08 pm
It's a very interesting interview, Richard talks about everything from his first mexican guitar, his love for jazz, charlie parker and jhonny smith, his work with Neil Diamond and obviously the one he did with MK, 26 years at now.
Recently we talked about Mark's way of treating people, but in this interview I hear a Richard very grateful for all the good he has had from the fruit of this collaboration.
The people he talks about are Chuck Ainlay, Paul Kennerley, Glenn, Guy, and he puts Mark at the top of the list of people he's worked with.
Sure that Mark intends to record a new album, he said it clearly, covid permitting, but as you could imagine he is not sure of a new tour ... we'll see  :thumbsup
Thanks Rich.  :clap
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: hunter on November 14, 2020, 07:58:25 pm
Very nice interview. I did skip a little; after all it was 3.5 hours :) Interesting to hear his descriptions of Mark, both as a musician/bandleader and person.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: boriszhukov on November 15, 2020, 10:11:38 am
Lots of great stories in this interview.
How Rich was worried on the first tour to talking about probably recording a new MK album soon.  Play it in double speed if 3.5 hrs is too long :-)
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: quizzaciously on November 15, 2020, 11:05:05 am
I remember when I became an MK fan back in 2005, of course eventually I would get to know about Richard’s recent album at the time, and it was amazing. Still holds up so well and bring so many memories! I used to listen to my CD player on the way to school listening to this album.

He’s right that instrumentals are so hard to do, so hard to make it interesting. And he did — by carefully constructing the solos. And this golden tone man... From another planet.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: knopflertom on November 15, 2020, 11:52:16 am
Lots of great stories in this interview.
How Rich was worried on the first tour t

Yes this part was very interesting and also that working with MK was very important turning point for him. (out of the blue) It seems that he is a very thoughtful and humble person. A nice man!
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: superval99 on November 15, 2020, 12:21:24 pm
Richard became quite emotional at times when he talked about Mark, even close to tears.    It is obvious he has a great respect for MK in many ways, not only in music. 
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: hunter on November 15, 2020, 01:03:05 pm
I remember when I became an MK fan back in 2005, of course eventually I would get to know about Richard’s recent album at the time, and it was amazing. Still holds up so well and bring so many memories! I used to listen to my CD player on the way to school listening to this album.

He’s right that instrumentals are so hard to do, so hard to make it interesting. And he did — by carefully constructing the solos. And this golden tone man... From another planet.


My only gripe about his albums is that they are very similar in sound and feel. Code Red is a bit different because it's more jazzy. But, he does his thing, and fans of that style get top quality. His guitar tone is sublime, though.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: quizzaciously on November 15, 2020, 08:12:56 pm
It was a surprise for me to know that a studio veteran with 50+ years of playing never plugs in his guitar at home. I never did as well, I always play unplugged at home.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: 2manyguitars on November 15, 2020, 11:06:09 pm
It was a surprise for me to know that a studio veteran with 50+ years of playing never plugs in his guitar at home. I never did as well, I always play unplugged at home.

It's the old 'rest headstock against the wall' thing isn't it. Anything to get a little extra resonance, or to annoy the neighbors! 😉

Quizzaciously, I found that hardly ever using an electric guitar for practice actually made me a better player. Especially practicing on something with a harsh action. For years I used to practice all the time on a battered old archtop with girders for strings. It meant switching to electric for sessions\live seemed really easy.

What do you think?

Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: quizzaciously on November 15, 2020, 11:22:16 pm
It was a surprise for me to know that a studio veteran with 50+ years of playing never plugs in his guitar at home. I never did as well, I always play unplugged at home.

It's the old 'rest headstock against the wall' thing isn't it. Anything to get a little extra resonance, or to annoy the neighbors! 😉

Quizzaciously, I found that hardly ever using an electric guitar for practice actually made me a better player. Especially practicing on something with a harsh action. For years I used to practice all the time on a battered old archtop with girders for strings. It meant switching to electric for sessions\live seemed really easy.

What do you think?

I think there's two kinds of guitar playing: physical one and musical one. And with physical learning, absolutely, acoustic guitar will boost your playing, classical guitar maybe even more because of the thick neck and wide string spacing. I think a lot of people do it that way, I remember that Tommy Emmanuel himself chooses 'tougher' guitars for practice just to get his physical guitar playing game strong, that's completely okay.

For people like me though, I don't care about it anymore. I can walk around not playing the guitar for the whole month, then I play it a bit, my fingers sore like crazy, but I get used to it quickly. For me the guitar really is like a friend, you get to see it every now and again, but don't need to see it everyday. I'm not a musician. I don't practice anymore, I just play for fun, strum good songs and record videos for my channel.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: quizzaciously on November 16, 2020, 12:24:26 pm
WOW

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4r-5Auwoj3w
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: hunter on November 16, 2020, 07:13:32 pm

I actually find it a bit odd that Richard doesn't plug in at home. The amp and the guitar combined make the instrument.

At home I use a Zoom G3n multi effect thing. Either with headphones, or I connect to my hifi. It actually sounds pretty good. The trick is to build your own patches, not use the stock presets, which are mostly garbage.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: quizzaciously on November 16, 2020, 08:03:05 pm

I actually find it a bit odd that Richard doesn't plug in at home. The amp and the guitar combined make the instrument.

At home I use a Zoom G3n multi effect thing. Either with headphones, or I connect to my hifi. It actually sounds pretty good. The trick is to build your own patches, not use the stock presets, which are mostly garbage.

I don't know, for me it's a combination of things. First, I'm lazy, so connecting a guitar to the amp is too much of work to me. Moreover, playing with amp is just too loud, I can't play loud because of the neighbours, then again I love to play at night when you can't use amps at all, because don't want to wake up everybody. So in every case going unplugged for practice is enough for me, I don't even bother plugging in when I transcribe songs, I just do it on an electric guitar without amp.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: 2manyguitars on November 16, 2020, 10:20:03 pm

I actually find it a bit odd that Richard doesn't plug in at home. The amp and the guitar combined make the instrument.

At home I use a Zoom G3n multi effect thing. Either with headphones, or I connect to my hifi. It actually sounds pretty good. The trick is to build your own patches, not use the stock presets, which are mostly garbage.

I don't know, for me it's a combination of things. First, I'm lazy, so connecting a guitar to the amp is too much of work to me. Moreover, playing with amp is just too loud, I can't play loud because of the neighbours, then again I love to play at night when you can't use amps at all, because don't want to wake up everybody. So in every case going unplugged for practice is enough for me, I don't even bother plugging in when I transcribe songs, I just do it on an electric guitar without amp.

It really depends on what's going to do the work to achieve the sound you want. Effects and patches are great and  99% of budding guitarists will find everything they want there.

I find more in just my fingers and the fretboard first, and maybe some subtle amp effects when necessary. I've spent (well borrowed 😄) thousands on effects gear over the years. Even the high end stuff like the Kempers, Headrush, and helix, while a real step forward and absolutely brilliant, miss the warmth of a decent tube amp.

What I will say is that just like with current drum plugins, the next generation of guitar effects will be incredible.

But it really does depend on what you're doing. Sometimes you want unique, sometimes you want to sound like a boss distortion pedal through a transistor amp from 1985. To quote the master - it's all about serving the song....
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: hunter on November 17, 2020, 03:15:42 am

I actually find it a bit odd that Richard doesn't plug in at home. The amp and the guitar combined make the instrument.

At home I use a Zoom G3n multi effect thing. Either with headphones, or I connect to my hifi. It actually sounds pretty good. The trick is to build your own patches, not use the stock presets, which are mostly garbage.

I don't know, for me it's a combination of things. First, I'm lazy, so connecting a guitar to the amp is too much of work to me. Moreover, playing with amp is just too loud, I can't play loud because of the neighbours, then again I love to play at night when you can't use amps at all, because don't want to wake up everybody. So in every case going unplugged for practice is enough for me, I don't even bother plugging in when I transcribe songs, I just do it on an electric guitar without amp.

It really depends on what's going to do the work to achieve the sound you want. Effects and patches are great and  99% of budding guitarists will find everything they want there.

I find more in just my fingers and the fretboard first, and maybe some subtle amp effects when necessary. I've spent (well borrowed 😄) thousands on effects gear over the years. Even the high end stuff like the Kempers, Headrush, and helix, while a real step forward and absolutely brilliant, miss the warmth of a decent tube amp.

What I will say is that just like with current drum plugins, the next generation of guitar effects will be incredible.

But it really does depend on what you're doing. Sometimes you want unique, sometimes you want to sound like a boss distortion pedal through a transistor amp from 1985. To quote the master - it's all about serving the song....


Oh, sure, there's nothing like the real thing, but as you know, a tube amp has to be turned up a little to move some air and sound good. Which is usually too loud if you live in an apartment building. And turned down low the sound is so anemic and uninspiring.


On my Zoom I just use a very simply patch consisting of an RC Booster going into a Fender Twin amp with a bit of tape echo and spring reverb added. The speaker cab simulation I use is actually a 2x12 Vox cab. This way I get a good clean sound with a touch of hair on it plus some ambience. Again, it's not the real deal, but it suffices for home use.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: 2manyguitars on November 22, 2020, 01:31:39 am

I actually find it a bit odd that Richard doesn't plug in at home. The amp and the guitar combined make the instrument.

At home I use a Zoom G3n multi effect thing. Either with headphones, or I connect to my hifi. It actually sounds pretty good. The trick is to build your own patches, not use the stock presets, which are mostly garbage.

I don't know, for me it's a combination of things. First, I'm lazy, so connecting a guitar to the amp is too much of work to me. Moreover, playing with amp is just too loud, I can't play loud because of the neighbours, then again I love to play at night when you can't use amps at all, because don't want to wake up everybody. So in every case going unplugged for practice is enough for me, I don't even bother plugging in when I transcribe songs, I just do it on an electric guitar without amp.

It really depends on what's going to do the work to achieve the sound you want. Effects and patches are great and  99% of budding guitarists will find everything they want there.

I find more in just my fingers and the fretboard first, and maybe some subtle amp effects when necessary. I've spent (well borrowed 😄) thousands on effects gear over the years. Even the high end stuff like the Kempers, Headrush, and helix, while a real step forward and absolutely brilliant, miss the warmth of a decent tube amp.

What I will say is that just like with current drum plugins, the next generation of guitar effects will be incredible.

But it really does depend on what you're doing. Sometimes you want unique, sometimes you want to sound like a boss distortion pedal through a transistor amp from 1985. To quote the master - it's all about serving the song....


Oh, sure, there's nothing like the real thing, but as you know, a tube amp has to be turned up a little to move some air and sound good. Which is usually too loud if you live in an apartment building. And turned down low the sound is so anemic and uninspiring.


On my Zoom I just use a very simply patch consisting of an RC Booster going into a Fender Twin amp with a bit of tape echo and spring reverb added. The speaker cab simulation I use is actually a 2x12 Vox cab. This way I get a good clean sound with a touch of hair on it plus some ambience. Again, it's not the real deal, but it suffices for home use.

That's not really true and is a valve amp myth. It's just about getting the right one. I have a couple of very small valve amps that I use for practice. My epiphone junior is great at low volumes and is also really versatile in terms of the range of valves you can swap in and out. I also have an even smaller selmer amp given to me by my dad. It's rated at 3w and puts out a satisfying burble at reasonable volumes.

Seriously, grab one. They're not that expensive and in terms of tone you won't look back.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: dustyvalentino on November 23, 2020, 12:30:17 pm
I'm also too lazy to plug in at home.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: qjamesfloyd on November 23, 2020, 01:48:36 pm
He’s right that instrumentals are so hard to do, so hard to make it interesting. And he did — by carefully constructing the solos. And this golden tone man... From another planet.
[/quote]

It can be done, the likes of The Shadows, Pink Floyd, Mike Oldfield have some great instrumentals.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: quizzaciously on November 23, 2020, 02:08:04 pm
It can be done, the likes of The Shadows, Pink Floyd, Mike Oldfield have some great instrumentals.

They have their strong brand names to back it up though, Richard has to go basically unknown into this territory. He's too underrated TBH, and I don't like it at all. Why everything close to MK is so underrated? I'm not complaining but it would be nice if the impact was more significant. Richard's music really deserves more recognition.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: dustyvalentino on November 23, 2020, 02:59:37 pm
Back in the 60s and 70s people had number 1 hit singles with instrumentals. Nowadays, not so much.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: hunter on November 23, 2020, 07:16:27 pm
That's not really true and is a valve amp myth. It's just about getting the right one. I have a couple of very small valve amps that I use for practice. My epiphone junior is great at low volumes and is also really versatile in terms of the range of valves you can swap in and out. I also have an even smaller selmer amp given to me by my dad. It's rated at 3w and puts out a satisfying burble at reasonable volumes.

Seriously, grab one. They're not that expensive and in terms of tone you won't look back.


I've had a VHT Special (or whatever it was called) with a 5 W and 1 W mode. It was decent, but even in 1 W mode, if you want a touch of hair, it's not quiet. So, for me, for home use, I'm perfectly happy with a modeller. If I ever get a house, I'll have a music room, and then I'll get a Twin Reverb he-he
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: 2manyguitars on November 24, 2020, 09:45:18 pm
That's not really true and is a valve amp myth. It's just about getting the right one. I have a couple of very small valve amps that I use for practice. My epiphone junior is great at low volumes and is also really versatile in terms of the range of valves you can swap in and out. I also have an even smaller selmer amp given to me by my dad. It's rated at 3w and puts out a satisfying burble at reasonable volumes.

Seriously, grab one. They're not that expensive and in terms of tone you won't look back.


I've had a VHT Special (or whatever it was called) with a 5 W and 1 W mode. It was decent, but even in 1 W mode, if you want a touch of hair, it's not quiet. So, for me, for home use, I'm perfectly happy with a modeller. If I ever get a house, I'll have a music room, and then I'll get a Twin Reverb he-he

Another good way of taking ANY valve amp down to neighbor friendly volumes is to put a volume pedal in the FX loop. That way you can drive the amp as hard as you like will decent full range tones and the pedal does the rest.

Kills by a mile any tone from a modeller, although the helix and headrushes of this world are getting closer.

Twin, now you're talking! 😁

Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: dustyvalentino on November 25, 2020, 12:56:00 pm
I'm fortunate to own a 1964 Fender Concert, 4x10.

Completely useless at home.  :smack
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: 2manyguitars on November 25, 2020, 03:22:01 pm
I'm fortunate to own a 1964 Fender Concert, 4x10.

Completely useless at home.  :smack

They are lovely amps! And so easy to work on as well.

You could always console yourself with this .

(https://i.postimg.cc/3JT4BHjv/download.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

 ;) ....
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: hunter on November 25, 2020, 08:04:16 pm
I'm fortunate to own a 1964 Fender Concert, 4x10.

Completely useless at home.  :smack


Nice! I bet it sounds glorious at gigs.


I once had a 40 Watt Rivera combo. At low, neighbor-friendly levels it was pretty anemic (it had a master volume, but even so), but when I got to crank it at blues jams - man, did it sing.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: Rolleyway Man on November 27, 2020, 03:51:17 pm
Here’s a thing. At around 2:43:00, Richard shows a blonde 1954 Telecaster, which he says was a gift from a very good friend. Could it be Mark’s ‘54? It’s hard to tell whether or not it’s the same instrument on the video as it’s difficult to see it in any great detail.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: quizzaciously on November 27, 2020, 04:15:35 pm
Here’s a thing. At around 2:43:00, Richard shows a blonde 1954 Telecaster, which he says was a gift from a very good friend. Could it be Mark’s ‘54? It’s hard to tell whether or not it’s the same instrument on the video as it’s difficult to see it in any great detail.

To be honest, I think there are more 1954 telecasters than just Mark’s, and he would probably tell that it’s his guitar, otherwise it would sound strange, at least to my taste.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: Rolleyway Man on November 27, 2020, 04:27:32 pm
Here’s a thing. At around 2:43:00, Richard shows a blonde 1954 Telecaster, which he says was a gift from a very good friend. Could it be Mark’s ‘54? It’s hard to tell whether or not it’s the same instrument on the video as it’s difficult to see it in any great detail.

To be honest, I think there are more 1954 telecasters than just Mark’s, and he would probably tell that it’s his guitar, otherwise it would sound strange, at least to my taste.

True. But it certainly isn’t beyond the realms of possibility that Mark would gift an instrument to someone like Richard. It just struck me as a bit of a coincidence that Mark happens (or happened!) to own a blonde 1954 Telecaster. And he does seem to have favoured his sunburst ‘66 Tele on recent tours. Still, like you say, it could have been a gift from any number of Richard’s musical acquaintances.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: quizzaciously on November 27, 2020, 04:40:21 pm
Here’s a thing. At around 2:43:00, Richard shows a blonde 1954 Telecaster, which he says was a gift from a very good friend. Could it be Mark’s ‘54? It’s hard to tell whether or not it’s the same instrument on the video as it’s difficult to see it in any great detail.

To be honest, I think there are more 1954 telecasters than just Mark’s, and he would probably tell that it’s his guitar, otherwise it would sound strange, at least to my taste.

True. But it certainly isn’t beyond the realms of possibility that Mark would gift an instrument to someone like Richard. It just struck me as a bit of a coincidence that Mark happens (or happened!) to own a blonde 1954 Telecaster. And he does seem to have favoured his sunburst ‘66 Tele on recent tours. Still, like you say, it could have been a gift from any number of Richard’s musical acquaintances.

Giving away guitars is a common practice, in fact, I actually got my Gibson Advanced Jumbo as a gift, I know a YouTuber Rick Beato got his acoustic Gibson as a gift as well. Somehow, these instruments become the best ones you’ve ever played.

Mark got his 1954 Stratocaster and the vintage Martin D-18 as a gift and for a long time this Martin is Mark’s main songwriting partner. He uses it everywhere and plays it in every interview ever since.

There’s a high probability that it was a gift from Mark because you have to be somebody to give away instruments of this magnitude, they’re not cheap!

Mark famously and pretty publicly gifted his signature Strats to many of his bandmates and friends, and even to his daughter, funnily enough.
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: dustyvalentino on November 28, 2020, 09:34:07 am
MK gave guitars to Roddy Frame and Tony Joe White.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Richard Bennett Interview
Post by: Rolleyway Man on November 29, 2020, 04:48:30 pm
MK gave guitars to Roddy Frame and Tony Joe White.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

And I believe it was Tony Joe White who gave Mark his ES-330.